How to get a 60 Day Indonesia Tourist Visa in Bangkok

It’s very easy to get a 60-day Indonesia tourist Visa in Bangkok.

The Indonesian Embassy is located at 600-602 Phetchaburi Rd, in Bangkok.

If using the sky train (BTS), get off at the Ratchathewi station and go down the stairs on the east side of the platform. Hmm, which way is East? It’s opposite the Asia Hotel Bangkok. After exiting the BTS station, you’ll be on Thanon Phaya Thai. Walk about 100 meters North to Phetchaburi Rd and turn right. The Indonesian Embassy is about 600 meters down, on the right.

What you’ll need

  • Passport, valid for 6 months with two blank pages.
  • Copy of Passport photo/identification page, the page with the most recent Thai entry stamp, and the Thai departure card that is stapled in the passport.
  • $45 U.S.
  • Two passport photos.
  • Proof of an onward ticket out of Indonesia.
  • Application.

Procedure

The embassy is open Mon – Fri from 9:00 a.m. to Noon to process applications. The application is quick to fill out, and they’re usually not too busy, so you should be out of there in 20 – 30 minutes. You’ll have to wait in line first to get the application, and then wait again to submit it, and then wait in another line to pay the fee.

Once the fee is paid, the cashier will give you a receipt that says when to return to pick-up your passport and visa. It is usually on the third business day between 2:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m (be sure to take the receipt). If you go on a Monday, your passport is usually ready on Wednesday, unless there is a Thai or Indonesian holiday. The embassy is closed on both Thai and Indonesian holidays, so processing time will be longer.

If you forget to make the required copies, the embassy staff will tell you to go to Pantip Plaza, just down the street, to get the copies made. Perhaps there used to be, but there is currently no place in Pantip Plaza that makes copies. It turns into a big hassle, and will cause you to lose a day if you can’t get back to the embassy before noon with the copies.

Other options

If you plan on being in Indonesia 30 days or less, a 30 Day Visa on Arrival  – for a fee of $25 U.S. – is available to citizens of the following countries: Algeria, Australia, Argentina, Austria, Bahrain, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Canada, China, Cyprus, Denmark, Egypt, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Laos, Latvia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxemburg, Maldives, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Oman, Panama, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, and The United States of America.

If you’re from Brunei, Chile, Equator, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Macao SAR, Morocco, Peru, Philippines, Thailand, Singapore, or Vietnam, no visa is required. You’ll get a free 30 Day entry stamp when you arrive.

These visa policies are correct now, but things do change. Please check the Indonesian Ministry of Culture and Tourism website for the latest visa requirements and other important information before planning any travel.

5 comments

  1. Nandini

    Hi Rick,

    A great blog you are publishing. Theres no as such organised information on things to do in say Jakarta or Bali or Surabaya, so on. Have you also spoken abt it in any of your other posts?

    Me had been to Bali some three years ago, and I had simply fallen in love with the place. Made a mistake though, booked through Thomas Cook travel company. They gave a shitty travel plan, which me had to tweak in the end.

    Do keep the posts rolling.

    Cheers

    Nandini

  2. tony

    thanks for the info. i want to ask u about this: ¨If you forget to make the required copies, the embassy staff will tell you to go to Pantip Plaza, just down the street, to get the copies made. Perhaps there used to be, but there is currently no place in Pantip Plaza that makes copies. It turns into a big hassle, and will cause you to lose a day if you can’t get back to the embassy before noon with the copies.¨

    what copies do you mean?? thanks a lot

  3. Alex Baum

    Hey! This is really well mapped out information and greatly appreciated. I should do the same thing for Penang’s consulate. Rick, I do have one concern, however; I have had an extremely difficult time procuring this visa (60-day) in places like Singapore, KL, and even Dili, Timor Leste. All these places seem extremely finicky about their rules, regulations, and whether or not they even still issue 60-day visas. Penang has always been a fantastic experience for me – they even remembered my name for a bit in there! The loveliest people to work in a government office I have ever met. Can expect something more like Penang, where I am guaranteed the visa as long as my t’s are crossed and my lower-case j’s are dotted, or is there a chance I’ll be turned down or made to jump through a long series of hoops to get what I came for? Oh, and one last question: I could swear the last time I got a 60-day visa in Penang, it was US $60. I see your post is a bit dated and just wondering if you had info for 2013. Thanks a bunch!

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